Why millennials are struggling with mental health issues

opinion piece

In a world where we compete to look like we are living our best life on social media, how many of us can honestly say we are truly happy?

Putting on a false smile in front of the camera, teeth gleaming, hair blowing in the wind – all whilst having a panic attack, intense palpitations, sweats of bead building on your palms. Look at you. You’re a walking contradiction. Your 10k followers on Instagram believe you lead the perfect life, but behind closed doors you often have dark intrusive thoughts. Penetrating thoughts that lead you to believe that you are worthless, lazy and a failure.

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Whilst social media may heighten the pressure young people feel to portray a perfect life style, it is far from the only issue contributing to mental health declination. Just imagine being trapped at your parental home until the ripe age of at least 28, working the most tedious job because employers won’t employ you in the sector you desire to work in; due to lack of ‘’experience’’- yet no one will give you a chance to gain experience. £40,000 worth of debt just to educate yourself, which in turn seems pointless as no one will give you a break? Brexit talks heighten the air of uncertainty. Political misdemeanour’s (corporate manslaughter at Grenfell Tower) and austerity push everyone to the limit both financially and socially. Young males being stabbed all around you on a daily basis. This is just the tip of the iceberg, I could go on.

Would you want to live like this? Choosing between having children or a stable career? Working full time and still not being able to afford decent food?

Sounds like a really messed up Hollywood film right? Because this is the reality of how most millennials are living right now.

I believe that our generation are struggling. It is not entirely impossible to succeed in the current climate; it just takes a lot of determination and discipline. But naturally we mustn’t forget that all these factors can contribute to a person’s mental state and well-being.  Life in your twenties is naturally a time of self-discovery, finding yourself and who you truly want to be. With these added societal pressures, both off-line and online, it can become overwhelmingly destructive for some people. Individuals will always have personal issues, and these need to be reviewed individually. However, at a time in your life where you yearn to progress and the system keeps beating you down, it is completely de-motivating for young people.

Unfortunately we cannot change politics, or at least the negative trickling effects it can have on us. But what we can change is our attitudes towards mental health. If you see someone updating a Facebook status stating how depressed they are, instead of calling them an attention seeker learn to see it as a cry for help. There have already been so many suicides this year committed by young people. Simple gestures and listening can have the power to help mental health sufferers. We have to keep pushing for change, more recognition, more funding for mental health services.

As fucked up as this system is, it is never going to beat me.  

Yours Sincerely,

Michelle (A struggling journalist pushing for a break)

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Pink Floyd: Their mortal remains, a review 

Events & launches

They are just that band for me. And they always will be. I can sit here all day and describe to you in intense detail how they subverted the progressive rock genre, how they revolutionised album artwork, introduced light shows to music performances, and completely took the entire world by storm. 


The V & A exhibition: Their mortal remains is a complete testiment to the band. Firstly it is sponsored by Sennheiser, and attendants are given their own headphones for the exhibition. This was a nice touch, and allowed everyone to have a personalised, emotive journey – in typical Floyd style. 

It was arranged in chronological order, starting from the psychedelic 60’s; channelling the huge influence from the late Syd. This section was particularly emotional, Syds story is a sad one. A creative genius, who sadly took one too many LSD trips and never came back. This section consisted of a variety of their experimental stage pyschedelic album artwork, staged in trippy rooms that made you feel high as a kite and littered with artefacts left behind by Syd. Handwritten letters to his girlfriends, a picture of the bands first car (a Bedford, and of course much more). The highlight for me was a video interviewing the band and associates about Syd. When one guy broke down talking about him, it bought a tear to my eye. Syds section was tributary, emotionally provocative and trippy. Shine on you crazy diamond. 


Throughout the exhibition you can see many of the bands greatly recogniseable iconography. The inflatable pig from Animals, the teacher from The Wall, the heads from The Division Bell. Meanwhile you are hearing excerpts from every album as you move through room to room. 


The absolute ultimate point for me was the last room, the entire room was taken up by screens…and Comfortably Numb was playing – it was then2005 concert when The Floyd performed at Live 8. It really bought the concert atmosphere to the museum. 

I’d say this exhibition is worth the £25 admission fee. I felt more emotion visiting this exhibition than I have in the last year. It reiterated to me how much we must appreciate Pink Floyd, their music and the fundamental messages they were portraying. Because, as mentioned in the exhibition; so many of the critical themes explored (particular in Dark Side Of The Moon) are still relevant now for every new generation. Austerity, isolation, time as a concept, depression and harsh realities of everyday life – they all hold such resonance. 


 Progressive, atmospheric, thought provoking sheer genius, which is utterly timeless.  This is one exhibition not to be missed out on.